Power’s Shadow, Physical Edition

Now the paperback edition of Power’s Shadow is live. It came together a little quicker than I was expecting, despite the fact that I had to reformat the entire manuscript and cover. Not that I’m complaining. In the process I found a few embarrassing errors that never should have been there to start with and one whopper of a continuity oops. Which goes to prove the old adage, “You haven’t edited your story until you’ve edited it stone cold.” I apologize for any past mistakes, but I do believe they’ve been fixed, in both the digital and paperback editions.

Now I’m thinking of doing the same to The Long Look, first in the series. Otherwise the physical edition is only available from third party sellers, since it’s long out of print. That way when I finally finish the fourth—and final—book in the series I’ll have everything available in both formats. Something to consider, anyway, though I do not want to get bogged down in my backlist when there are more books to write.

On an entirely separate note, I almost had fresh tomatoes this year. I picked up some heritage plants at the Cooperstown Farmer’s Museum and even got them planted in good time. First the deer damaged one plant, which lived but never bloomed. The second was doing great and had tomatoes almost ready, but then they disappeared. Poof. Gone. I don’t think it was deer this time, but I am noticing some very well-fed squirrels loitering about. Oh, well. Try again next year.

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Story Time: Our Lady of 47 Ursae Majoris

Today’s Story Time was written about the time astronomers were first piecing together convincing proof of other planets in the universe. Something we all had just assumed to be true before, but now some bright soul had the idea (and equipment sensitive enough) to detect the faint drop in brightness a distant sun displays as an orbiting planet passes between it and us. All I remember about writing this story was the news that at least one planet was detected orbiting  a sun in the constellation of the Great Bear. As for where The Lady or the Gan came from, your guess is as good as mine.

Our Lady of 47 Ursae Majoris was first published in Third Order, vol.2 #1, Winter 2008, an online zine that specialized in stories concerning religion, which this story doesn’t. Except it sort of does, too.

 

As always, this piece will remain online until next Wednesday, June 27th. Then not.

Hiatus

When I consider that the most interesting thing happening this week and for several others is the struggle to co-ordinate and light a fire under the electrician, the plumber, and the contractor we need to get a (final?) home project done, it’s time to take a hard look at where I am and what I’m doing.

I have a novel project hanging fire, I’m way behind in my reading, and the only thing I’ve managed to produce consistently is this blog and a weekly piece of flash fiction, and I’ve gotten to the point where the only thing I feel like talking about is political. I just can’t go there.

As much as I hate to admit it, something has to give, at least temporarily, and it has to be the Monday blog post. I hope I can get back to it in a few weeks. Meanwhile, Story Time will continue on schedule, and if I have anything to say worth hearing I’ll post it there.

Stay Safe.

Nellis Tavern

In our continuing efforts to learn more about the history of our new home, yesterday Carol and I attended the Rhubarb Festival at the Nellis Tavern. The Nellis Tavern sits between St. Johnsville and Nelliston on HWY 5. It was originally built by the Nellis family, Palatine Germans who had fled to this country after repeated invasions from France. The house was built as a block (fortified) farmstead something like Fort Klock, with a stone house and mill on the site, around 1747. The original buildings were replaced by the current structure in the early 1780’s and it served as a tavern and inn along the Mohawk River. It remained a tavern and private home through most of the 19th century before the building was abandoned around 1950. It has since been taken over by the Palatine Settlement Society, which is overseeing its restoration.

This picture shows the restoration of the original wall stenciling that decorated the tavern. The right side of the picture shows the original stenciling over plaster, sort of like wall paper without the paper. As you can see, the restoration follows the original very closely.

Here’s a closeup of the exterior, front. I don’t have any good pictures of the interior, but it was crowded and difficult to get any good shots. We plan to go back and have a regular tour of the place now that the Rhubarb Festival fundraiser is over. As for that, we had Raspberry-Rhubarb upside down cake. It was delicious.

 

 

Story Time: Laying the Stones

In acknowledgment of the recent passing of Gardner Dozois, today’s Story Time is “Laying the Stones,” the very first story Gardner ever bought from me (and my second ever pro sale), breaking a long and very burdensome drought on my part. It appeared in the November, 1994 issue of Asimov’s SF and, as you can see, in very good company.