More Yamada

I just found out maybe five minutes ago that the second Yamada story (as in the new ones post events in The Emperor in Shadow) sold to Beneath Ceaseless Skies. There’s still the slight matter of line edits and a minor revision or two. I don’t mind. I like doing revisions. Gives me a chance to make something good even better. I’m weird that way. The working title is “A Minor Exorcism” (spoiler: It ain’t minor).

The first of the new ones, “Uzumaki of the Lake,” is scheduled for issue #300, which should be out in late March 2020.

I like where I live, but being a southerner in NY state has taken some adjustments. For instance, I think I’ve probably had to shift a couple of metric tonnes of snow since I’ve been here. It’s rather like the wag’s definition of a weed: “A flower daring to place itself somewhere you don’t want it.” Snow does that too, for all that it’s pretty. And the season is rapidly approaching. I’m thinking I need backup.

I broke down and bought a snow blower.

As in gas-powered, electric start, self-propelled, metal chute, the works. I tried a battery-powered model first. It was useful, but ultimately unequal to the task. Rather like me. Together with the beast being delivered on Friday, maybe that will change.

 

 

Checking In

My contributor’s copy for the reprint of “Night, in Dark Perfection” in China’s Science Fiction World arrived a few days ago, shown left. I can’t read it, but I hear the story wasn’t bad.

I’ll be participating in a group flash fiction reading at @littlefallslibrary¬† (Little Falls, NY) on Wednesday, November 13, at 6PM. Stop by if you’re in the area.

Little Fire & Fog has been selling well since its release (hard to do before release unless there was a pre-order. Which there wasn’t. I’m not that patient.). My thanks to everyone who took a chance on it. There’s one stellar review up already.

Otherwise, I’m starting a new project that’s going to take a while. Not saying what it is just yet because I don’t want to jinx it, but at least some of you will be pleased to hear..when I get around to telling you, that is. Until then, the occasional cryptic update might be all there is.

 

Little Fire and Fog

I’m running a bit late today, I know. Not as late as last week, when the blog didn’t get posted until Wednesday, but late nonetheless. The image to the left is a big part of the reason. Also, I can’t wait until Wednesday this week since I have Jury Duty. Another motivation to get this wrapped up while I still can.

The long novella project, Little Fire & Fog goes live today. My editor got through with it late last week, the rewrite is finished, and I’m doing this as an indie book. It came in just over 35k, too short for an official novel, but it doesn’t miss it by much. I like the way it turned out. Now we’ll see if anyone else does.

There was a time I wouldn’t even consider going indie on anything. These days and for some projects, it’s really the only path that makes sense. LF&F is more akin to the type of fractured fairy tale I used to publish in Realms of Fantasy back in the day. That was then and now isn’t, and the market has changed, as it always does. There’s no professional market at all for that sort of thing just now. I like writing them, but if I want anyone to actually read them, this is the only game in town.

Finally, shout-outs to Scott Andrews and Kij Johnson for their World Fantasy Award wins. Congratulations to all the winners but likewise to the nominees. It really is an honor just to be nominated. I remember.

 

Rewrite Time

First Reader has returned the manuscript for the novella project, so it’s rewrite time. I’m about fifty pages in, trying not to rush, trying not to dawdle, and above all trying to get it right.

Some writers hire editors for indie projects, which is a good idea in general. Me, I married the best one I know. She’s thorough and pulls no punches, even if she does have to live with me. Which is probably why she pulls no punches. Just between you and me, I think she enjoys them.

For the good of the work, of course.

I don’t normally have so much trouble with titles, but this one is beating me up. I still haven’t been able to improve on my original. I also don’t think the original quite does it justice. That is, it describes the story perfectly to me, but that’s not the title’s job. Its job, it should go without saying, is to give enough of a hint to the reader to let them know this is worth reading. It’s a tough gig, titles. Almost like a separate skill from writing the story in the first place.

Just as an aside, if anyone out there gets their ebooks on Kobo, The Ogre’s Wife: Fairy Tales for Grownups, is finally getting a Kobo release, as of October 31st. I’ll put a link up when I have one.

 

 

 

Roots

When I was a kid I developed an interest in family history, mostly because I didn’t know much of it. The reason is no one was recording it. Older relatives would talk about this or that Great Uncle, or who was my cousin three times removed (not removed enough, in many cases). Then they passed and whatever they knew was gone with them. So I started a family history.

Did not get very far.

Then came the internet, and new sources of information and tools to build family trees. So in my copious free time I got into that, with some surprising results. Mainly because what I found out didn’t always match family tradition or my own weak efforts. First of all, my original research convinced me the paternal line first arrived in the new world in the mid-1700’s. Nope. Turned out to be about a hundred years earlier. My paternal grandfather thought we were from Wales. Nope again. England, specifically Essex. Both sides of the family even, except for my father’s mother’s side. Scotland. And from my mother’s mother’s side, Germany.¬† Though in my paternal grandfather’s defense he did say we came west from North Carolina, which was true, though the family lived for several generations in Virginia first.

Fascinating? No, not even a little. Naturally it interests me to find I had knights, earls, lairds, a baron, a viscount and one king in the tree. But I wouldn’t expect anyone else to give a darn. So why am I telling you all this? Because of a picture I remember from my childhood. It’s of my grandmother as a child, taken sometime in the 1930’s at a farmhouse with her extended family. Dirt poor Mississippi farmers near the end of the Great Depression. Her ninth great-grandfather was a frickin’ baron.

Sure, I have an academic interest in where I came from. (and it was great fun to learn that my 15th great-grandfather was a laird who got kicked out of Scotland for robbing a church). Idle curiosity satisfied. But in the immortal words of Lucy Van Pelt (via Charles Schulz) “Now that I know that, what do I do?”¬† The answer, of course, is “nothing.”

Doesn’t change a darn thing. I’m grateful to all my ancestors for getting me here, if unintentionally, but that’s all they’re responsible for. Anything else, it’s on me.