Bergstryker U and Backlist

As I mentioned last week, the Bergstryker U stories are getting a new edition and cover without the pseudonym. I acknowledge they’re mine, and I take full responsibility. In atonement, there are now two stories, a novelette and short story, for the price of one of the original editions…which are now off-sale forever. Cheap AND fun. What more could you ask?

Right now I can only link to the Azon edition, but iBooks and Kobo are in the works.

As people in my Newsletter already know, as time permits I’m adding print editions to those of my backlist which never had them. Little Fire & Fog was the test case and is now available in print chapbook format. I thought it turned out pretty nice. I’ll be working through most of the others, at least novella length and above until everything that should have a print edition, does. I’m currently working on The Ghost War, and expect to have it online next.

If you were signed up for the Newsletter, you’d know most of this already. There’s free stuff, too.

Your Free Book Awaits. Sign up for my Newsletter and it’s yours.

Always in Motion, the Future

This is now the cover to The Long Look, first in The Laws of Power series. Those following the series might recall that the first cover was a bit different. It used the same artwork as the original Five Star hardcover which I still like, but subsequent books in the series went in a different direction by necessity, making the first book appear less and less like it belonged with the others. Which it does, even if there is a 500 year disconnect between the first and second. Thus the change. It also connects nicely with The Collected Tymon the Black, so that’s a plus.

The cover for the eventual release of The Seventh Law of Power should coordinate with the first three. So that, you know, it does sort of look like a series.

A few years ago I wrote a couple of stories about a fictional University attended by mythical creatures, monsters, and the occasional human. I thought they were fun. Other people whose opinion I respected thought I could certainly sell them but they were too different from what I was writing at the time (there is a strong element of the romantic) and best not put them out under my own name. I listened. Maybe I shouldn’t have, but I did. Since I was adverse to shopping them around under a pseudonym, I just put them on Azon myself…under a pseudonym. There they rested until someone who knows my work outed me as the author.

I’m not upset about it. Rather the opposite. I’m glad the secret’s out because I don’t think I did right by them. Both were available as short reads and I have since de-listed them. My plan is to re-list them with a better cover, revised text, and together as a two-fer, under my own name this time. Tales of Bergstryker U, or something of the sort. Maybe I’ll even continue the series. You know, in my abundant free time.

I’m also pondering the future of this blog I’ve been doing since my Livejournal days. I said earlier that the blog will continue and I stand by that, but in planning revisions to this web site I’ve been considering a slight change in emphasis, which might entail moving the blog to an occasional subject of the Newsletter while the web site shifts to other duties. Still considering, but if ya’ll have an opinion I’d love to hear it.

Your Free Book Awaits. Sign up for my Newsletter and it’s yours.

Memory Lane Needs a Touch-Up

I was saddened to hear of the passing of Charles R. Saunders, best known in the sf/f community as the creator of the Imaro series. This was back when Sword & Sorcery was the hottest ticket in fantasy town, and Saunders’ series was unique at the time for having a black hero as the star. He was a pioneer.

For my own part I never met him, the closest I ever came to that was being a fellow contributor to Gene Day’s old print fanzine Dark Fantasy, but I do owe Saunders a special debt, which I would like to here and now acknowledge–he was responsible for the second novel I ever wrote (hubris alone was the cause of the first). At the time he was editing a small-press project called Dragonbane that I had submitted a story to. Or at least in my naivete I thought it was a story. Saunders wrote me a very polite rejection stating what was obvious to him and less so to me: it wasn’t a story at all.

It was the opening chapter of a novel.

It did take me a while to realize he was right. When I say “a while” I mean it literally took me five years to write the book he already knew was there. Now, to be fair and accurate, it was not a book which will ever see the light of day (and that was on me, not him) but it was indeed a book. One that needed to be written so I could learn from it and move on. I still remember it fondly and my only regrets are I couldn’t do right by it, and that I didn’t listen to Charles’ advice sooner.

RIP.

P.S. I had to take a look back through some submission records that had miraculously survived a few moves to find the name of the project. A list full of stories now lost and magazines that no longer exist, but fun memories all the same. Now, forward.

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Let’s Take This Show on the Road

“Where Strange Drinks and Even Stranger Clients Meet.”

Which might somewhat describe the newsletter, except for the drinks part. You’re on your own there.

Ahem.

Crossed fingers and held breath, I think I have everything together. If not, I’ll be the second to know. Regardless, the image to the left is the cover for the prize I’ve arranged for those signing up for my newsletter, Tales From the Black Dog.

What is The Black Dog, you might ask? I’ll summarize it thusly:

“The Black Dog is an odd little pub, with strange drinks and an even stranger clientele. Sometimes it’s there. Sometimes it isn’t. Sometimes you’ll find it, and sometimes you won’t. Just don’t hit on the bartender or the bouncer, whatever you do. She’s a Banshee and he’s a Redcap. It won’t end well for you.”

The book itself is a collection of eleven flash pieces I wrote mostly for fun about the pub and the mix of humans and non-humans who inhabit the place. Those who have read Little Fire and Fog may recognize some of them. Those who have read much of mine may notice some of my themes and interests come up. Those who haven’t, I think it’s a fair if brief introduction to what I’m about. It also includes the only real Tuckerization I have ever done, though who? Ain’t telling. They know what they did. The individual pieces have appeared only in a very small (maybe 20 people) private FB group. This collection appears nowhere, period (except on your computer if you so choose), and won’t for the foreseeable future. It is my gift to you, and I hope you like it.

There will be a link on the main page, but I put one here also where you can sign up for the Newsletter.

The list asks for your email address (duh), name, and country you’re in. The name is just how you like to be addressed (Grand Moff of the Galaxy? You do you), and the country in case I need to do anything special to comply with EU rules. After that you’ll be given a link to the download page where you can choose the ebook format you prefer and have at it. Couldn’t be simpler. Well, it could, but it’s still pretty simple.

For those who do sign up, let me know how it went. I’m new at this.

Ringing the Changes

Not inaccurate but incomplete. I’m thinking more of an addition rather than a change (although I’m likewise considering some tweaks to the website. Lord knows it could use a refresh).

Ahem. Excuse the tangent. The point I’m getting to is I’m seriously considering starting an email newsletter. And by “seriously considering” I mean yeah, it’s very likely going to happen. Not today, but not the distant future either. Such things require planning to do right which requires time which you’d think I’d have tons of, being largely confined to the house except for necessary errands, and you’d think wrong. There’s always something else I need to be doing aside from what I want to be doing. So it goes…

Sorry. Tangenting again. So here’s the thing: Why a newsletter? What’s wrong with the blog?

Well, lots of things, but that’s not the point, even if the blog isn’t going away. There are advantages to a private email list that a blog doesn’t have, and not just for me. For a start, what if I want to give actual readers a heads-up on a special promotion or giveaway or preliminary book cover, but am not ready to or don’t want to broadcast it to the world? That’s a newsletter’s job.

I’ll give you another example. When I sold “The Fox’s Daughter” to Beneath Ceaseless Skies, I announced it here and over on FB. One of the biggest fans of the Yamada series didn’t see the post, even though we’re FB friends (FB is like that). It took a share from another reader to bring it to their attention. Whereupon they were somewhat put out that they weren’t immediately informed, and can’t say I blame them. When I mentioned a newsletter? They demanded to be signed up first, and when the time comes, so I shall. People are less likely to miss stuff that might interest them that way.

Frequency? Probably once a month or so, at most. And when I say “private” email list, I mean exactly that. I will not sell it and I damn well won’t share it. This is just for you and me, for however many iterations of “you and me” there are. That’s for you all to decide.

There will likely be some bonus for signing up. Haven’t decided what yet. Likely an original work before it’s available anywhere else, that kind of thing. Something else to think about.

So what do you think? Hate newsletters? Love them? What’s a newsletter? Speak now or I’ll likely just do what I want. Very dangerous, that.